Anthony Vine

Selected Works


Hallways

For Quartet

Anthony Vine, electric guitar
Matt Evans, electric guitar
Katy Gilmore, dance
Kathryn Logan, dance


premiered in Brooklyn, Summer 2014

> video preview

'Hallways' has many identities: as a site-specific performance, a piece of dance on film, and a platform for experiments in improvisation. It is a long form, malleable project that seeks to constantly redefine and question its identity through an intimate and intensive history of body, brain, and aural knowledge and familiarity. The work itself was born from the structural metaphor of a hallway. These hallways manifest themselves as spatial and/or sonic sieves that filters the improvisatory nature of the piece. Hallways range from specific harmonic frameworks to ensemble configurations, and change according to the medium, space, and situation.

Currently, we are working on a film version of the work, which should be released in the coming months. A preview is available above.



[Sound on Video]
[Video on Sound]

Sound-focused videos, captured exclusively through mobile apps


> blog

The videos featured on the homepage of this site are selections from a series of short sound-focused videos that I created during the Summer of 2013. At the time, I became infatuated with Instagram and Vine video platforms: in particular, the tactality of shooting video from your phone, the lo-fi nature of the product (and the artifacts that come along with this process), and developing a repertoire of techniques (grainular textures, lighting and filtering, etc.). These simple apps made the expensive and time-consuming process of creating video extremely easy, and I began to use these apps as a daily creative exercise, like Brahms's morning counterpoint exercises. Descriptions of these videos and my initial thoughts on the project can be found in the blog above.



Unadhaesit in Tempus

JR Gualtieri, video

Eric Falck, dance
Kristina Isabelle, dance
Gabby Stefura, dance
Kristina Isabell, dance


> video

"A collaborative work intended to demonstrate a type of four dimensional perception. The movement of bodies is stacked in time to allow past, present and future moments to exist simultaneously, creating novel shapes which are present in all movement, but lay outside of our ability to observe. Also - a love story. Inspired in part by Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut, Pas de Deux by Norman McClaren and The Unreality of Time by J.M.E. McTaggart." - jr gualtieri